The top 5 stories residents should read

Kevin B. O'Reilly
Editor
AMA Wire
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Stories that offered compelling data and information on themes affecting individual residents struck a chord with readers, and they remain relevant reads today.

The impact of parenthood on residency. With women comprising one-half of medical school graduates, two recent studies examined the experience that residents have when they decide to become parents during training. Find out how common parenthood is and how it impacts men versus women.

Budget tips for medical residents. Making it through medical school and residency on a very limited income is one of the many challenges of life as a physician in training. But careful planning and following advice from physicians who have successfully completed that phase of their careers can help turn personal finances during training into less of a worry.

Tragedy sparks program to create work-life balance for medical residents. After news that a star surgical resident committed suicide after leaving Stanford to pursue a fellowship, the residency program leadership decided to create a new structure that aims to address the underlying issues affecting resident health and promotes a healthier work-life balance.

3 things medical residents want after long shifts. Duty-hour literature often focuses on residents’ need for sleep in recovering after lengthy shifts, but are there other methods of recovery that are also valuable to residents? A study on residents’ activities post-call identified two processes in addition to sleep for how residents want to recover. Learn what they are and see how you compare.

Where new physicians practice: 3 key postresidency trends.  Wonder where your peers practice after training? A national report highlighted top practice trends among recent residents, including the percentage who practice in medically underserved areas and those who have earned faculty appointments at MD-granting schools.

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Dec 29, 2016
The death of a resident or a fellow by suicide can be earthshaking for coworkers and patients alike. A toolkit provides expert advice for survivors.