Our 5 most popular stories of 2016

Kevin B. O'Reilly
Editor
AMA Wire
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Dating, marriage, Match, burnout. When stories had a personal dimension, they hit home. These were our best-read articles this year.

Medical specialties with the highest burnout rates. Work-related burnout is a pervasive problem among physicians—and it’s worsening across all specialties, according to a national study. Learn how burnout has increased in just three years and which specialties reported the highest rates of burnout. Where does yours fall on the list?

4 building blocks for a successful medical marriage. Physicians and their spouses face obstacles—such as workloads, call hours, stress and household demands—in forming and maintaining healthy relationships. Researchers defined four themes that work for physician families who have found the formula for harmony at home.

Study examines what it costs to interview for medical residency programs. You hear it all the time: Lodging and transportation for residency program interviews are expensive. But exactly how much are your peers spending on them? A national survey of more than 1,000 fourth-year medical students provided insights, including how much students spend on residency program interviews based on their desired specialties.

2016 medical residency programs matching: By the numbers. The 2016 Match was the largest ever recorded by the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and resulted in a higher overall match rate than the year prior. With 42,370 total registrants, this year’s Match eclipsed the record set in 2015 by 1,036 registrants, according to data released by the NRMP.

4 tips for dating a medical student. As a medical student, you may face particular relationship challenges if your significant other doesn’t have first-hand experience with juggling the unique demands of medical school. If this sounds familiar, reference these key insights for a successful relationship from the partner of a recent med school graduate.

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Apr 24, 2017
A social psychologist says that only by addressing breakdowns in physician engagement on a systemwide level will the incidence of burnout diminish.